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Friday, July 03, 2015
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The Iron Brigade, including the 19th Indiana, depicted at McPherson's Ridge during the Battle of Gettysburg 152 years ago. Of the 288 Hoosiers who fought, 27 died, 133 were wounded and 50 were missing in action.
The Iron Brigade, including the 19th Indiana, depicted at McPherson's Ridge during the Battle of Gettysburg 152 years ago. Of the 288 Hoosiers who fought, 27 died, 133 were wounded and 50 were missing in action.
Friday, July 03, 2015 10:11 AM
By CRAIG DUNN
    
KOKOMO – Pvt. Abram J. Buckles looked forward to the coming fight. Buckles thirsted for all the honor and glory he’d seen others get; impatiently he sought the chance to do his duty. He thought he knew how he should seek it. “I had always had a great anxiety to carry the flag of my regiment and did not know how I could get the place of color-bearer, unless by serving in the guard until I could see a proper chance to pick the flag up, should the color-bearer be killed or wounded,” he later recounted. As Buckles drifted off to sleep that evening, with full stomach and singleness of purpose, he could not have dreamed what the next day would hold. There would be plenty of opportunity for glory in Pennsylvania, in whatever form it was defined.
    
Sgt.  Maj. Asa Blanchard roused his men early on July 1. Blanchard was a deep-voiced, popular soldier; there was no one more positive, and at times even hilarious, in the regiment. From all indications, the regiment was in for a hard day, and Blanchard wanted the men ready when the time came to move out. At 8 a.m., the column got under way, marching toward Gettysburg. First in column was the 2nd Wisconsin, followed by the 7th Wisconsin. The Hoosiers were next, all 288 men and officers. The 24th Michigan followed; then the 6th Wisconsin brought up the rear of the brigade.
    
The 19th Indiana that marched down the Emmitsburg Pike was by now an experienced and battle-hardened regiment. It was led by experienced officers and fleshed out by the hardiest and bravest of the enlisted men, the rest having leeched out through storms of fire and as a result of their own inadequacies. Shortly after commencing the movement on Gettysburg, the men could hear the deep-throated boom of artillery fire reverberating in the distance.
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  • By BRIAN A. HOWEY
    NASHVILLE, Ind. – Historical karma seemed to flow out of every American pore last week, with South Carolina at the epicenter. Following the almost unfathomable atrocity at the Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston the week before, what the world witnessed in this bloody aftermath was a brand of Christianity where the faithful walked the walk, and talked the talk, in phrases we hear in a political context even up here in the north. The families of the victims, confronting the pathetic shooter Dylann Storm Roof at his arraignment, revealed a stunning power of forgiveness that should live as an heroic example for the ages. Growing up in Northern Indiana, I was a faithful adherent to President Lincoln and was a Civil War aficionado. I dutifully observed at 7:22 a.m. April 15, 1965, the 100th anniversary of the Great Emancipator’s death before heading to school. I was about as Yankee as you could get. Yet it was my church, Main Street United Methodist in Peru, Ind., that opened my heart to the people of South Carolina. Our Methodist Youth Fellowship group performed annual work trips over spring break, and for three years in the early 1970s, we traveled south of Charleston to Yonges Island near Edisto Beach, where we did work projects with the local African-American Methodist Church. 
  • By MAUREEN HAYDEN
    INDIANAPOLIS – Running for statewide office isn’t easy when you have little name recognition among Indiana’s 4.8 million voters. Just ask Eric Holcomb, who started campaigning in March for next year’s U.S. Senate election. In a Howey Politics Indiana poll conducted in late April by Bellwether Research, 62 percent of voters said they’d never heard of Holcomb. Those voters won’t go to the polls for months. So Holcomb is going to them. In the first 30 days of his campaign, he traveled to events in 30 cities and towns. He’s pledged to visit all 92 counties before county fair season ends in August. That’s on top of a promise to shoot a basketball in a high school gym in every county, a goal that you can see he’s well on the way to achieving if you scan his Facebook page. Holcomb says the pace is exhausting but exhilarating. “Every time you go somewhere and talk to people, not just about their problems but about what they think are solutions, it fuels the rest of your day,” he said. 
  • By JACK COLWELL
     SOUTH BEND – What happened to that prominent political figure in neighboring Illinois was surprising. Consequences are serious. Dennis Hastert? No. This is about Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner. He’s the one who told the Chicago Tribune editorial board that he intends to “rip the economic guts out of Indiana.” Indiana Gov. Mike Pence helped Rauner toward that goal in promoting what was ridiculed nationally as a Hoosier freedom-to-discriminate law. But this isn’t about the silliness of these neighboring states trying to steal jobs from each other instead of working together for the economic good of both. Maybe Rauner’s threat of “coming after Indiana big time” is understandable after Indiana sought to steal jobs with billboards asking Illinois employers if they were “Illinoid by higher taxes.” The surprise was a unanimous decision of the politically split Illinois Supreme Court. Consequences are serious for Rauner, the Republican governor, and the Democratic-controlled Illinois legislature. 
  • By BRIAN A. HOWEY
    INDIANAPOLIS - Since 2010, Hoosiers have consistently lined up against President Obama’s Affordable Care Act. When we asked the September 2012 question in the Howey/DePauw Indiana Battleground Poll on whether you’d back a candidate who opposed Obamacare, by a 55-37 percent margin, our respondents agreed. Perhaps the most astute, adroit Hoosier in all of government, Long Beach-bred U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. has now twice preserved the ACA. In a landmark decision announced on Thursday, Roberts, a conservative jurist appointed by President George W. Bush, joined the 6-3 majority, explaining, “Congress passed the Affordable Care Act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them. If at all possible, we must interpret the Act in a way that is consistent with the former, and avoids the latter. Section 36B can fairly be read consistent with what we see as Congress’s plan, and that is the reading we adopt.” In contrast, Associate Justice Antonin Scalia wrote a scathing dissent, citing “interpretive jiggery, pokery” involving the ACA tax subsidies that 159,000 out of the 180,000 Hoosiers now receive via the federal ACA exchange. Seated next to a stony faced Roberts, Scalia would pronounce the ACA as “SCOTUSCare.” In essence, Chief Justice Roberts is telling the nation that if Americans don’t want Obamacare, they need to elect a president and a Congress that will repeal and replace the act. It is not up to the Supreme Court to make the determination. 
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Cubs v. Sox
Chicago White Sox vs Chicago Cubs - Round 1 (Craig Robinson vs Nick Offerman)
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  • HPI Analysis: A riveting week that changed America
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    INDIANAPOLIS – In a riveting 24-hour period last week, Americans saw the U.S. Supreme Court reaffirm Obamacare, then legalize same-sex marriage in all 50 states. A few hours later at the funeral for South Carolina State Sen. Clementa Pinckney, the full frontal assault on the Confederate battle flag continued, quickly spreading from President Obama’s citation of the flag as racist, to a similar assessment from Republican Jeb Bush, to retailers such as eBay, Amazon and Walmart, to the Alabama statehouse where Gov. Robert Bentley ordered its removal from the heart of Dixie. It was a stunning week that changed America in ways rarely witnessed at such a pace. While Congress and state legislatures remain mostly inert as the general public evolves quickly on social issues, it was the Supreme Court and the corporate community that decisively moved the needle. What remains to be seen is whether this evolution folds seamlessly into American culture, or whether this is only the calm before various groups on the social right regroup and prepare for other fights along other picket lines.
        
     
  • Horse Race: Rev. Harrison files 6,600 ballot signatures in Indy
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Probable independent candidate Rev. Charles Harrison submitted more than 6,600 ballot petition signatures at Tuesday’s deadline. Harrison has not made a final decision on whether to enter the race where Democrat nominee Joe Hogsett is the favorite at this point. In other political news, Jodi Buoscio lost in a thumping to Indiana Rep. Tim Wesco in 2014 elections for his post (Vandenack, Elkhart Truth). That’s not deterring the Elkhart Memorial High School teacher from Osceola. She announced Thursday, June 25, she’s going to try again for the District 21 Indiana House seat, citing Wesco’s “extremist and divisive” positions. “Tim Wesco’s sponsorship and support of the so-called religious freedom bill in the 2015 legislative session made us a national laughing stock,” Buoscio, a Democrat, said in a statement.
     
  • Horse Race: Thomas continues to ponder GOP challenge to Pence
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Indianapolis auto dealer Bob Thomas is still pondering entry into the Republican primary, and perhaps even an independent gubernatorial bid. “It is still under consideration,” Thomas told HPI on Tuesday. “But taking on a sitting governor is a huge undertaking. I don’t want to get into a bloody primary and then give the seat to the Democrats.” Thomas began pondering a challenge to Gov. Pence following the Religious Freedom Restoration Act episode last April. Thomas said that he is talking with Republicans about the race. “I’m talking to the adults in the party,” he said. “Everybody thinks the same way. They are scared to death this guy is going to get beat in November.” Thomas is looking at mid-July to make a decision.
     
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  • 'Go get 'em Wayne': Former Sen. Wayne Townsend dies at 88
    “I’m saddened to learn of the passing of Wayne Townsend, who leaves behind a great legacy of leadership. Wayne was a solid family man, a farmer, and voice for all Hoosiers who was beloved by the people of his district and across the state. My heartfelt sympathy and sincerest thoughts are with his family during this time.” - Senate Minority Leader Tim Lanane on the passing of former State Sen. Wayne Townsend of Hartford City who died Friday at age 88. Townsend’s 1984 “Go get ‘em Wayne” was a classic gubernatorial campaign, even though he failed to upset Gov. Robert Orr. Purdue President Mitch Daniels called Townsend “one of our greatest Boilermakers” and thanked him for “a lifetime of unsurpassed service.” 



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